Making Peace With the Past: First Teen Crush

My main project for 2018 is recycling painful past journal entries to create new art and make peace with the past.

I wasn’t kidding about taking my time with this project, huh? I started this second spread in January and I finished it this morning, but I think during that time I finally figured out the right balance of old versus new that I was trying to achieve. Even though it’s probably going to be my most light-hearted page, I’m glad I took the time to process it and build on it.

The meaning behind this page isn’t very deep. Dexter Holland (The Offspring) was my first teenage crush and 2000 was the peak of my obsession – I don’t think there was a journal entry from this time that didn’t mention him. It was such a pure over-the-top teenage girl crush that I thought it was only right to preserve it and dedicate a spread to him!

As usual with this project, I tore up pages from an old journal (summer of 2000) and painted over them. I left some writing and clipart about Dexter peeking through and added pictures of him and Noodles that I drew in 2000. I added in the drawing/painting of the Smash album art, some doodles based on other Offspring album art, and lyrics. I think I made a page that 13 year old me would be proud of!

Who was your first teenage crush? Do you still like them or do you look back on it with a “what was I thinking?!”? I would love to hear about it!

Making Peace With the Past: Taking My Time

My main project for 2018 is recycling painful past journal entries to create new art and make peace with the past.

I started keeping journals in the summer of 2000, just after turning 13. My first attempt at journaling was quite cute, really. It stemmed from boredom at having to be dragged around the country watching my younger brother play cricket. I was still slightly too young to stay home alone, so 3-4 times during the summer holidays we would stay in hotels for 2 or 3 nights at a time and visit different cricket grounds around Wales and England. To amuse myself, I would provide a running commentary of our travels while writing about my favorite things (namely The Offspring, my cuddly toys, wrestling, and boys – it was a simpler time) and also fill the book with little doodles – I was sort of art journaling before I even knew the term!

July 21, 2000 – An excerpt from the original first entry in my first ever journal

I decided to start this project with the journal from 2000 not only because it made sense chronologically, but because I thought it would be an easy one to deal with. I was barely a teenager and my writing was still very upbeat and optimistic (even though I was bored and hated not being at home on the computer!). However, I still found it difficult to start this process.

July 23, 2000 – A drawing of a school near the cricket ground my brother was playing at

It took me two weeks to finish the first spread, which was frustrating to me. During my Year of Creative Habits project last year, I got in the habit of making journal pages quickly and often. I think this is going to be a good lesson in slowing everything down and taking my time. I will have to keep reminding myself that this isn’t something I can just finish in a day, week, or even a month. Just because I am able to complete pages quickly, it doesn’t mean I necessarily should. I want to make sure I do this right and in a way that I won’t regret later.

I made the decision to do my best to preserve any art I made or ephemera I kept from the time. I am also keeping a note of anything I think might be important for me to remember, with the rest being torn up and covered over. Here is how the first spread turned out:

The page turned out messier and busier than I would have liked, but I think it was because I started pushing paint around in frustration. I wanted to start but I didn’t know how. Slapping paint on haphazardly meant I was at least doing something with it.

I was tempted to update the doodle and make it bolder/better, but ultimately thought it was better to keep it the way it was drawn the first time. I think it gives that part of the page a dreamy, “in the past” look. I also kept the Offspring clip art I was so proud of!

Hopefully now that I’ve made one page, it won’t be so difficult to carry on… but I’m also allowing myself to slow down and take as much time as I need.

Burning Your Diaries

Originally posted August 3, 2014 on etherealsolitude.wordpress.com. I am posting it as a pre-cursor to the project I will be restarting next year: recycling painful past journal entries to make new art & hopefully heal old wounds.

In 2011, an article appeared on an Archives mailing list I am subscribed to and it really struck a chord with me (so much so that I’m still thinking/writing about it three years later!). As my title suggests, the article is about the keeping, and eventual burning, of diaries.

My purely written journals were kept throughout my teenage years and, like the author of the article, I wrote in them compulsively. I would say I have about 80% of of my teenage days documented in those notebooks.  You might think that this is amazing, that I can reach under my bed and find out exactly what was happening 10 or 15 years ago, but those scribblings are hideous. High school was the worst time of my life and it definitely shows in those pages. You would think that over time I would be able to read them objectively, like looking into the life of someone else, but I can relate to the what the author says about that too:

[…] I riffled through the pages, reading. I was shocked that even things that had happened 20, 30 years ago felt as familiar and as raw as if they had happened yesterday. That so unnerved me that I stopped reading. I didn’t want to wade back into those depths, where a powerful riptide still churned.

Whenever I decide to delve into them for whatever reason, I’m transported back. I suppose it doesn’t help that the journals are kept in the same bedroom I did all the writing, but I’m fairly sure the same feeling will creep over me wherever they are kept.

The article also reminded me of something an English teacher said in class one day – that people pretended that writing diaries was for the writer only, but really they wrote in diaries secretly hoping that other people would read them, otherwise what was the point in keeping them? In my shy way I attempted to argue that keeping a diary was just a kind of therapy, to purge all the negative thoughts and try to make sense of the world. I think he agreed with that, but he stuck to his theory. It did make me question my motives for a while, as I used to have a fantasy that I would bury my journals somewhere and they would get found well into the future by interested people, but in all honesty I would be appalled if anyone read them – even people in the distant future who wouldn’t know me.

This is why the article interested me.  The author did not want to be remembered by those painful diaries, and so she burned them:

Burning those diaries, I realized I didn’t want my sons to know how profoundly I had suffered from the slides down the chutes, the tumbles through the holes that gaped open in the scaffolding of my life. That would be too hard for them. I wanted them to remember me as one who clambers back. That’s the person they grew up with. A person who picks herself up and gets going again.

I can relate to that. My journals were written when I had a lot of growing up to do… they are immature, melodramatic, and embarrassing. But what else can you expect from a teenager? I still don’t want to be remembered that way, regardless. It’s very difficult to decide what to do. If I decide to burn them all, then there’s no going back and I’d just have to let it go. I could be selective about what I remember from that time and wouldn’t have to deal with the pain after reading them. Sometimes I think that having too many memories can be a bad thing; maybe I would have let some stuff go a long time ago if they weren’t  hanging around? Sometimes I think that they have too much of a hold on me and it would be best if one day I just decided to dispose of them.

I always get the first part of the monologue from Marry the Night: The Prelude Pathétique by Lady Gaga stuck in my head when I think about this. It’s a nice thought. However, I don’t know if I could burn my journals. As much as I feel ashamed by them, I can’t escape that it all happened and led me to being who I am now. From an Archivist perspective I would also be destroying memory (or memory aids, at least).  I can’t help feeling like I would regret that.

Last year I had the idea to “recycle” old journal entries and make them into a new art journal pages. I described the project as attempting to make peace with the past; I guess I was trying to “fill in all the ugly holes”. Here are two pages I made using journal entries (and drawings) from 2001 (the lyrics on the right are by Slipknot, I promise it has relevance):

I’m not sure how I feel about the process now, especially since my journals were helpful in dating a lot of the photographs I’ve been organising recently. This is going to sound pretentious, but maybe I should write memoirs from them with all the “important” stuff (to me, I’m not honestly expecting anyone to be interested in my inane teenage years!) and burn or recycle the rest? I’m just thinking out loud, I don’t know if I’ll ever come to a decision with this.

I’d love to know how other people feel, though. How would you feel about people finding your journals?  Do you feel like you write purely for yourself? Could you ever destroy your journals?  I’m also really interested to know if fellow art journalers happily let others look through their art journals? Even though I share a good chunk online, they’re still journals and I’m pretty guarded about people having free reign.  Please share your thoughts!